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Gigabyte begins GP-P850GM / P750GM PSU exchange program

by Mark Tyson on 16 August 2021, 10:11

Tags: Gigabyte (TPE:2376)

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Gigabyte launched its GP-P850GM and GP-P750GM compact modular power supplies this time last year, but they aren't enjoying a happy anniversary. There are multiple reports from users and professional reviewers that these PSUs aren't really up to scratch – or could even be dangerous. Now, Gigabyte has responded with a statement on the reported issues, and it has kicked off a program where users can send the PSU back via its Return and Exchange service to get the Over Power Protection (OPP) adjusted.

On the consumer side of things, these Gigabyte PSUs have gathered poor reviews from customers of major retail sites like Newegg, where the 850W model garnered a 39 per cent one egg rating, and the 750W model and even more dire 53 per cent one egg rating. Common complaints are that the PSUs arrived DOA, or failed very shortly after installation. Perhaps worse are the complaints that other expensive PC components were badly affected by the PSU. Sadly for some Newegg customers, they basically had these Gigabyte PSUs foisted upon them in a GPU and PSU bundle deal, which was the only way they could secure a new GPU.

Tech sites and YouTubers that have had these PSUs in their labs are also quite damning in their opinions of the Gigabyte GP-P850GM and GP-P750GM compact power supplies. Tom's Hardware reports that Gamers Nexus had five of 10 of its samples fail in OPP tests – with some failing at just 60 per cent load during their first pass. Meanwhile, Hardware Busters, hosted by Dr Aris Mpitziopoulos, had a GP-P750GM 'explode' (see image below). Dr Mpitziopoulos' analysis stated that the OPP and OCP at 12V protections were set too high, and the "low quality FETs… unknown Caps" couldn't deal with the load.

In light of the above, Gigabyte's solution of a Return and Exchange service to complete OPP tweaks might sound reasonable. However, it is questionable whether it is enough with the issues claimed to be rooted more broadly. Moreover, with so many complaints of DOA PSUs - the OPP won't have even been triggered yet – one hopes the Gigabyte engineers do a bit more than tweak the OPP values when they get these returns.

The recall/service covers of the following serial numbers:

  • GP-P850GM S/N from SN20343G031011 to SN20513G022635
    Adjusted OPP trigger point range from 120% ~ 150% to 110% ~ 120%
    Before: 1020W ~ 1300W
    After: 950W ~ 1050W
  • GP-P750GM S/N from SN20243G001301 to SN20453G025430
    Adjusted OPP trigger point range from 120% ~ 150% to 110% ~ 120%
    Before: 900W ~ 1125W
    After: 825W ~ 925W

It would be interesting to hear of any HEXUS reader experiences with the above PSUs – please use the comment facility below.



HEXUS Forums :: 15 Comments

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Presumably, these are the same PSUs that Gamer's Nexus released something of an expose on late last week, where they had actually footage of a number of them ‘exploding’, after testing quite a few over several months. That description might be a tad sensationalist, but certainly, “bursting isnt flame” isn't.

This is not a good look for Gigabyte and together with lots of reports of user problems with some of their Aorus mobo's (it starts to look like either you get a good one or you don't) is enough to convince me to just avoid them at the moment, despite solid experience in past years. It's just convincing enough evidence of a chance I don't feel like taking.
Saracen999
Presumably, these are the same PSUs that Gamer's Nexus released something of an expose on late last week, where they had actually footage of a number of them ‘exploding’, after testing quite a few over several months. That description might be a tad sensationalist, but certainly, “bursting isnt flame” isn't.

This is not a good look for Gigabyte and together with lots of reports of user problems with some of their Aorus mobo's (it starts to look like either you get a good one or you don't) is enough to convince me to just avoid them at the moment, despite solid experience in past years. It's just convincing enough evidence of a chance I don't feel like taking.

I've avoided Giagbyte since several Mono issues both hardware (DOA and short term use failures) and software since at least 2008.

These are the same ones that Steve from GN made a serious point about. That and the fact they're being bundled with GPUs that will certainly push them way over their bad engineering design/QA testing is also dire. Linus and Luke discuss this and from Linus' perspective they're trying to shift dead/bad stock while knowing they're bad hardware which is either gross incompetence or malice.

I'm also concerned the replaced units aren't actually “fixed”, it technically means they'll have lower capabilities than before without generally fixing the issues.
Weird question, why does it say “ Tom's Hardware reports that Gamers Nexus..” and not “Gamers Nexus reports” ? Is it something to do with print vs video ?
Tabbykatze
I've avoided Giagbyte since several Mono issues both hardware (DOA and short term use failures) and software since at least 2008.

These are the same ones that Steve from GN made a serious point about. That and the fact they're being bundled with GPUs that will certainly push them way over their bad engineering design/QA testing is also dire. Linus and Luke discuss this and from Linus' perspective they're trying to shift dead/bad stock while knowing they're bad hardware which is either gross incompetence or malice.

I'm also concerned the replaced units aren't actually “fixed”, it technically means they'll have lower capabilities than before without generally fixing the issues.
Yeah, I first saw it on the WAN show, which is why I then went to GN.

I guess whether it's “fixed” or not depeds on the fault??

I mean, if they cut the OPP from 150% to 120% and it still delivers the rated power in a correct manner, then it could be argued that the OPP was set too high, in erromr, and it's been corrected.

If I remember the results correctly, the GPUs they're bundled with shouldn't put them over. But what did, pretty regularly, was the maximum loading by power testing gear. Surely, if they still deliver rated rated, but the OPP is scaled back so that it delivers up to that point, they're still providing rated power, plus some, and the OPP stops them delivering so much that they cook themselves.

But either way, it's still not good for Gigabyte. It shouldn't have been able to happen in the first place.
Tunnah
Weird question, why does it say “ Tom's Hardware reports that Gamers Nexus..” and not “Gamers Nexus reports” ? Is it something to do with print vs video ?

That stood out to me as well…