vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

So what's Turbo Flash?

by Steve Kerrison on 3 January 2007, 17:15

Tags: Corsair

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qahlj

Add to My Vault: x

Your first thought is wrong. It's not a way to quickly expose one's self in public. Oh no. It is, in fact, much more decent than that.

Turbo Flash is a product from memory manufacturer Corsair that is designed to be used by Window's Vista's ReadyBoost technology. But we've not really answered the question, just thrown in another name... so what's ReadyBoost? The idea is that Vista stores data on a USB flash drive that it regularly needs, but isn't the best use of RAM. It is, hopefully, quicker to retreive it from a flash drive than regular hard disk.

So, Turbo Flash is designed to be nice and nippy in particular scenarios, allowing Vista to use it as fast-access data store. Here's more info from Corsair:

Using dual channel controllers and SLC memory, these USB drives offer fast read/write speeds and have been tuned specifically for random read of 4KB files across the entire device. This is a requirement for a device to be ReadyBoost capable... and not something the average USB Flash Drive can achieveā€¦

Indeed, some USB flash drives are slower than hard drives, so there'd be little point using them as ReadyBoost targets. While we reckon enthusiasts would rather just add more RAM, there's bound to be a market for those looking for an easy, hassle free performance upgrade.

Turbo Flash

We'd give you a link to Corsair's product page, but there doesn't seem to be one yet, such is HEXUS's nose for new products. More info will appear in a matter of days, we're told.



HEXUS Forums :: 14 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
good read thx.
Article
Using dual channel controllers and SLC memory, these USB drives offer fast read/write speeds and have been tuned specifically for random read of 4KB files across the entire device. This is a requirement for a device to be ReadyBoost capable… and not something the average USB Flash Drive can achieve…

So is there a NAND/NOR flash memory issue involved? Wikipedia says that NOR has 4KB blocks as opposed to NAND's much larger blocks. If anyone understands the technical details and can explain them in a sentence or two I'd be quite appreciative.
Theres already a complete list of suppsoedly compatible devices here: http://www.grantgibson.co.uk/misc/readyboost/
This seems like a big gimmick really, are there any benchmarks that show ReadyBoost actually being useful?
Sounds interesting, I'd also like to see some benchmarks before I buy into any hype though!