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Corsair brings Force Series 3 SSDs to market

by Navin Maini on 16 May 2011, 13:00

Tags: Corsair

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qa5wq

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Corsair has announced its Force Series 3 family of SSDs - claiming to deliver SATA 6Gbps performance, at nearer SATA 3Gbps price points.

 

 

Powered by the SandForce SF-2281 controller, maximum sequential read/write speeds come in at up to 550MB/s and 520MB/s, respectively, depending on capacity, and the manufacturer adds that 4KB (aligned) random write operations per second are rated at 85,000 IOPS.

Corsair tells us that the Force Series 3 will be available in 60GB, 120GB and 240GB capacities, with suggested price tags of $139 (60GB), $219 (120GB) and $499 (240GB).



HEXUS Forums :: 4 Comments

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The prices of these and the OZC new series are roughly 20% higher than the previous generation of drives. Considering the relative high prices and low movement of units, you'd think they would have come in at the same price to help sell more and then drop the prices of the previous generation.
£100 for a 60GB drive is just too expensive when people don't have money.
There's a good chance that the initial retail price won't stay high for long now that there will be more SF2xxx controllers in the market.

The good news about this drive is that it entirely negates the point of buying from dodgy OCZ (25nm transition fiasco, £40 to RMA to their Netherlands office, waiting till the last minute to admit OCZ Core/jmicron controllers are pants even)
I chuckled at the comment in the article on (4k aligned) IOPS.
Anyone who runs Windows XP and one of these is simply a complete fool.:mrgreen:
Performance with Windows 7 and an SSD is much better as is the OS overall. (Windows 7 automatically 4k alignes any drives) Investing £90 in Windows 7 is a better investment than a minimum of £100 on one of these. Of course, being SATA 6Gbit, they would also have to own a fairly modern motherboard and therefore been spending loads on hardware and nothing on updating their 10 year old OS.
semo
The good news about this drive is that it entirely negates the point of buying from dodgy OCZ (25nm transition fiasco, £40 to RMA to their Netherlands office, waiting till the last minute to admit OCZ Core/jmicron controllers are pants even)

The last thing I RMA'd to OCZ's Netherland's office cost me about a quid in postage. It's in the EU - it's really not that much hassle even to get it tracked. Granted, it's not as convenient as a UK office, but it wouldn't stop me buying from them. Hell, to RMA G.Skill (IIRC) RAM I had to post it off to Hong Kong or some such place. That's what I call an inconvenience.