vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

ATi keeps on spinning to try to get R600 right

by Willy Deeplung on 12 December 2006, 17:29

Tags: ATi Technologies (NYSE:AMD)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qahin

Add to My Vault: x


HEXUS Dragon Tour 2006 logo

Willy boy's trawl of the back-street markets of Taipei has given us some background to the delays suffered by the R600 DirectX 10 graphics processor - All the might of the AMD/ATi combine can't deliver R600 on time - and he continues to spill the Beanz...

ATi has attempted to create good working versions of the R600 a number of times but, for various reasons, has needed to re-spin the GPU. The company is now up to spin A13.

However, that does not mean it had to do a dozen re-spins!

One of the two numerals indicates the version of the silicon spin; the other the version of the metal spin. Think of it this way - when the spin revision is designated Axy, then x is for silicon, and y is for metal.

It’s rare - close to unheard of - to get everything right first time, so re-spins are an expected and planned-for part of the design-proofing process. But, the fewer a maker can get away with the better, especially since each costs in the region of one million US dollars!

That, of course, is small beer when the building of a fabrication plant can cost many billions of dollars but every penny saved helps the bottom line.

Far more important, though, the fewer re-spins there are, the earlier mass production can start - and the sooner the GPU can come to market and money can start flowing in towards the maker's piggy-bank.

The reasons why a re-spin might be need can be highly technically convoluted. They can also be ultra simple. Humans, remember, are involved in the production decisions.

With A11, as we understand it, the issue was very, very simple. Someone forgot to connect the pins that let the GPU communicate with the outside world.

D'oh!

Bang goes your Christmas bonus, sunshine!

We don't know the state of play with the A13 spin but do understand that ATi has got A12 running at a speed of 1GHz.

That's around half the target speed of the production version, which is now set to arrive some time in "early" 2007 and not before Christmas as originally promised. That gives NVIDIA's faster-than-a-ferret-on-pheromones, DirectX 10 GPU - the G80 - a quarter's head-start or more.



HEXUS Forums :: 5 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
“We don't know the state of play with the A13 spin but do understand that ATI has got A12 running at a speed of 1GHz.

That's around half the target speed of the production version,”

You meant RAM clock not GPU clock, right?
:O either way that is immense, its either 4Ghz GDDR4 ram or 2Ghz clock speed… but that can't be true :S… it sounds far too good
I think you are both right - sometimes Willy's missives are not crystal clear!

:rolleyes:

For sure, ATi is targeting GPU clock speeds beyond 1GHz but not, I'd imagine, 2GHz in the near future.

So it's most likely RAM clock speed that's approaching or already at 2GHz.

With our Willy's permission, I'll try to make this clearer in the original and in any related threads or front-pagers - but think it best I do nothing right now until I get another of those electrionic emaily messages from his self clarifying the situation.
Bob Crabtree;940734
I think you are both right - sometimes Willy's missives are not crystal clear!

:rolleyes:

For sure, ATi is targeting GPU clock speeds beyond 1GHz but not, I'd imagine, 2GHz in the near future.

So it's most likely RAM clock speed that's approaching or already at 2GHz.

With our Willy's permission, I'll try to make this clearer in the original and in any related threads or front-pagers - but think it best I do nothing right now until I get another of those electrionic emaily messages from his self clarifying the situation.

I'm sure Ry, sorry Willy, will be out of bed now in sunny Taiwan :p
Why is there such market visibility of single mistakes in production for ATi? I can't decide if they have a flawed chain such that human errors count for more than usual (R520 anyone?), that they're being unusually open about the process (or making excuses), or that NVidia's moles are feeding choice things to the journalists to hamper the marketing effort.