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Team Group launches the QX 15.3TB 2.5-inch SATA SSD

by Mark Tyson on 2 September 2020, 10:11

Tags: Team Group

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaenyh

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Team Group has written to HEXUS to announce that it has launched the QX Extra Large SSD. Coming in at 15.3TB, this device is claimed to be the "industry's largest consumer grade 2.5-inch SATA SSD." Indeed the biggest I could find on sale today in the UK was 4TB, with the Samsung 870 QVO 8TB out of stock everywhere - but due shortly (20th Sept according to Scan).

A few technical details about the QX 15.3TB 2.5-inch SATA SSD are available to whet your appetite. Team Group says the drive utilised 3D TLC NAND and promises "ultra-high durability," with the drive purported to be stable and reliable. This aspect of a storage device seems to be all the more important as capacity increases. The device maker provides some durability figures, saying the QX offers >2,560TB, that it has a MTBF of 1,500,000 hours, that it is shock and vibration resistant, and can operate at between 0°C ~ 70°C. Buyers get a three year warranty.

As a 2.5-inch SATA device, the QX doesn't have any surprises on the performance front. Team Group says user can expect Read/Write: up to 560/480 MB/s, as measured by Crystal Disk Mark. No IOPS figures were given and I can't see them on the product web site. Aiding performance is the 'Smart Duel Cache' which is Team Group's way of describing a hybrid of SLC and DRAM caching technologies. I don't know the size of the SLC or DRAM caches.

Various SSD technologies are supported for longer life and better access / transfers speeds. The QX supports TRIM optimisation, NCQ, garbage collection, Wear-Levelling, and ECC functions.

As for pricing and availability, Team Group told HEXUS that the QX 15.3TB 2.5-inch SATA SSD will be "made by order," and that the price will be US$3,990. If you head on over to the official product page you will see a 'Contact Now' button where you might expect a buy button to be. This leads to a standard looking contact form where you can express your interest.



HEXUS Forums :: 7 Comments

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ExaDrive is 1.1k$ less.
Anyway its good to see some more big SSDs, maybe it will push a little price drop of large HDDs.
DevDrake
ExaDrive is 1.1k$ less.
Anyway its good to see some more big SSDs, maybe it will push a little price drop of large HDDs.

Any interesting new SSDs will take sales from HDDs, making HDD volume lower and hence pushing up their price.


I must say the storage density of these is rather nice. With a 24 bay 2U server that's a third of a petabyte, and I suspect if you are buying by the petabyte you could negotiate a discount on the SSDs.
DanceswithUnix
DevDrake
ExaDrive is 1.1k$ less.
Anyway its good to see some more big SSDs, maybe it will push a little price drop of large HDDs.

Any interesting new SSDs will take sales from HDDs, making HDD volume lower and hence pushing up their price.


I must say the storage density of these is rather nice. With a 24 bay 2U server that's a third of a petabyte, and I suspect if you are buying by the petabyte you could negotiate a discount on the SSDs.

That's what I'm thinking, that and pricing of Solid State stuff seems to hit a somewhat exponential curve at higher densities so I'm not surprised at the expense.

But being able to squash that much storage into a 2u chassis while maintaining a standard SAS/Sata backplane without having to migrate to something insane for NvME storage arrays is a boon.

Might have to upgrade from a 6gbps LSI card to a 12gbps though to maintain performance :P
Tabbykatze
That's what I'm thinking, that and pricing of Solid State stuff seems to hit a somewhat exponential curve at higher densities so I'm not surprised at the expense.

But being able to squash that much storage into a 2u chassis while maintaining a standard SAS/Sata backplane without having to migrate to something insane for NvME storage arrays is a boon.

Might have to upgrade from a 6gbps LSI card to a 12gbps though to maintain performance :P

One of these drives per blade on a blade server could make one heck of a Ceph storage pool as well. If they still make blade servers, they were all the rage a while back but not heard of any recently.
DanceswithUnix
One of these drives per blade on a blade server could make one heck of a Ceph storage pool as well. If they still make blade servers, they were all the rage a while back but not heard of any recently.

Blade servers are always in the wings, the big thing with blades is using them alongside Citrix to provide a full fat desktop to those that need it. In our org, we were planning on using a 9 unit blade to run a cluster of Logpoint data analysis systems to distribute the event workload from multiple customers.

You can pick up Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge blades for quite cheap now!

Although one of these drives is the same price as the entire unit xD