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Intel Sandy Bridge CPU appears in retailer listing

by Pete Mason on 3 November 2010, 11:28

Tags: Core i5, Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

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Intel's next-generation Sandy Bridge processors aren't supposed to arrive until the tail end of 2010 or - more likely - the start of next year. However, it looks like a retailer here in the UK has published a listing a little early and while they aren't available to buy, we do have some idea of the pricing.

The processor that has appeared is the Core i5 2500k and retail site More Computers has it listed for £170.63. The page doesn't divulge too many details, though it does list the chip as running at 3.3GHz and having a 6MB L3 cache.

This actually lines-up perfectly with earlier details suggesting that the quad-core CPU would have a 3.7GHz Turbo Boost, an 850MHz graphics-core that will boost up to 1,100MHz and a 95W TDP. Unfortunately, this model is expected to ship without support for Hyper-Threading.

The only other thing that we know is that the K-series chips will, once again, be multiplier unlocked - a very handy feature given that the Sandy Bridge CPUs are expected to overclock very well, based on Intel's early demos.

All of this means that we have a speedy quad-core CPU with an unlocked multiplier and a lot of headroom that could potentially ship for around £170. For comparison, Intel's current-gen Core i5 655K is shipping now for around the same price. Though it's clocked at a similar speed, has an unlocked multiplier and supports Hyper-Threading, it only has two physical cores. We already know that, clock-for-clock, Sandy Bridge will outperform Clarkdale chips by around 20 per cent, meaning that the new chip should bring an awful lot more performance for the same price.

If this sort of pricing turns out to be accurate, Intel's latest and greatest will be positioned fairly aggressively and are likely to provide an awful lot of bang for the buck.



HEXUS Forums :: 9 Comments

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All of this means that we have a speedy quad-core CPU with an unlocked multiplier and a lot of headroom that could potentially ship for around £170. For comparison, Intel's current-gen Core i5 655K is shipping now for around the same price. Though it's clocked at a similar speed, has an unlocked multiplier and supports Hyper-Threading, it only has two physical cores. We already know that, clock-for-clock, Sandy Bridge will outperform Clarkdale chips by around 20 per cent, meaning that the new chip should bring an awful lot more performance for the same price.

A better/alternate comparison is to the £145 Core i5 760, 2.8GHz, so the new CPU would have a 17% clock speed advantage and 20% higher perf per clock, for a 17% price increase… so not that amazing, a good incremental increase.

Dual core chips have looked poor value for a while against that the cheaper quads, they were better for games and non-multitaskers with the clock speed advantage, but even that is limited/gone.
kingpotnoodle
A better/alternate comparison is to the £145 Core i5 760, 2.8GHz, so the new CPU would have a 17% clock speed advantage and 20% higher perf per clock, for a 17% price increase… so not that amazing, a good incremental increase.

Dual core chips have looked poor value for a while against that the cheaper quads, they were better for games and non-multitaskers with the clock speed advantage, but even that is limited/gone.

You're not wrong, but I was going for a similarly priced multiplier unlocked CPU. That's also the cheapest K-series CPU I could find, so offers quite a big boost for the money.

Comparisons or not, it should be a pretty speedy piece of silicon.
I wonder how many will be bought in error with punters mistaking 1156 for their socket 1155.
The problem with compating it to the i5 760 is that chip doesn't have integrated graphics - so for the mainstream user (i.e. people without dedicated graphics cards) this chip has a whole load of extra value.

Plus, the fact that intel have produced a chip with higher performance per clock, a higher clock speed AND an integrated GPU in the same power envelope as the 760 is pretty impressive to me!
BullDogg
You're not wrong, but I was going for a similarly priced multiplier unlocked CPU. That's also the cheapest K-series CPU I could find, so offers quite a big boost for the money.

Comparisons or not, it should be a pretty speedy piece of silicon.

True, comparing K to K it looks good. The 875K though is the closest in capabilities, at £260… so I suppose for £90 less you are getting 400 extra MHz with each being 20% better… which I make approximatively a 35% faster for, £90 less, all you miss out on is HT, but as CK says you gain the integrated graphics (how many who want a K class will use that though??). So actually looks better like that.