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Samsung launches CRG5 240Hz G-Sync curved gaming monitor

by Mark Tyson on 11 June 2019, 11:11

Tags: Samsung (005935.KS), NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaeaqb

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Samsung has launched another gaming monitor. In this latest foray into the gaming monitor market, Samsung has armed itself with the CRG5, a 27-inch curved G-Sync compatible monitor supporting very fast refresh rates. This is the first ever monitor designed for G-Sync from Samsung.

Central to the new CRG5 is a display panel with 1500R curvature. As usual for the PR accompanying any curved monitor release, the improved immersive qualities are highlighted. Adding to the immersion on offer are the minimal bezels, and wide viewing angles of the VA panel. The qualities are all well and good for gamers but for this target market probably the highlight will be the G-Sync compatibility and the max refresh rate of 240Hz on offer.

"Combining a 240Hz refresh rate with NVIDIA G-SYNC compatibility in Samsung’s new CRG5 curved gaming monitor gives gamers advanced performance for the most graphic-intense games," said Seog-gi Kim, EVP of the Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. The new CRG5 was presented and later demonstrated at the PC Gaming Show, at E3 yesterday.

Some will consider the 1080p resolution rather coarse at 27-inches, but it might be the right choice if gamers are intending to push the frame rates towards the top end of this monitor's range. This display provides a 3000:1 contrast ratio, with the nice inky blacks characteristic of a VA panel. Samsung's CRG5 has a typical brightness is 300cd/m2, and the screen a gtg response time of 4ms.

Dedicated gaming features include; game mode settings for different game genres (plus 3x custom profile slots), low input lag mode, virtual aim point, and black equaliser. More generally useful features are an eye saver mode, and flicker free settings.

Samsung supplies the CRG5 with a tiltable monitor stand and the ports are; DP 1.2, HDMI 2 (x2) and headphones. The monitor will become available globally in Q3 2019, it will cost approx US$399.



HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

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This was quite interesting until I read that the resolution is 1080p. It's a bit odd that Samsung chose to release a G-Sync monitor though, given that Nvidia now support Freesync. Maybe it was in production before the Nvidia announcement? Give me a 2560x1440p 27" 240Hz VA monitor, preferably flat, & I'd reach for my wallet :)
MrJim
It's a bit odd that Samsung chose to release a G-Sync monitor though, given that Nvidia now support Freesync.

NVIDIA supporting FreeSync isn't a real replacement for G-SYNC, particularly for monitors that go as high as 240Hz, so it's not that odd.
Hoonigan
NVIDIA supporting FreeSync isn't a real replacement for G-SYNC, particularly for monitors that go as high as 240Hz, so it's not that odd.

How do G-Sync & Freesync differ, other than cost, & additional hardware used by the former? And why particularly for monitors at 240Hz?
MrJim
How do G-Sync & Freesync differ, other than cost, & additional hardware used by the former? And why particularly for monitors at 240Hz?

They each have their own pros and cons, but one pro for the G-SYNC camp is something called Low Framerate Compensation; this is a technology that helps to prevent stutter outside of the Variable Refresh Rate's operating window.

For example (and this is just a very rough example) this monitor might have a VRR of between 120 and 240Hz, but outside of that, FreeSync won't function, whereas G-SYNC, as far as I understand it, works all the way from 1Hz to whatever the screen is capable of.

There's also the certification process that G-SYNC monitors need to pass which you could argue results in a better overall experience.
I don't think the article mentions the VRR range of the Samsung monitor, but I guess the lack of low framerate compensation could be an issue, depending on range. I noticed that Freesync 2 supports LFC amongst other things. It'll be interesting to see how many G-Sync monitors are released in the future though.