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Intel introduces second "Pineview" Atom processor

by Parm Mann on 1 March 2010, 10:13

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

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Intel continues to dominate the netbook landscape with its Atom processor, and has this week taken the opportunity to introduce the follow-up chip from its second-generation Pineview line.

The processor, dubbed the Intel Atom N470, arrives as a faster-clocked alternative to the existing Atom N450.

Set to run at 1.83GHz, Intel's latest ultra-low-power part offers a 10 per cent bump in core frequency, but there's no change elsewhere. Like the 1.66GHz N450 before it, the N470 features a 45nm hyper-threaded CPU with 512KB of L2 cache and support for DDR2-667 memory, in addition to an integrated GMA 3150 GPU and a built-in memory controller. Despite the bump in CPU clock speed, the Atom N470 retains a 5.5W TDP.

The Atom N470 will continue to be paired with Intel's NM10 Express chipset and the semiconductor giant tells us to expect systems based on the chip to be unveiled by "major OEMs" in the coming months. Don't expect a huge shift in Atom performance, but Intel reckons the higher clock speed will make for "additional responsiveness for online and basic computing tasks".



HEXUS Forums :: 2 Comments

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and first review I read say they couldnt tell any difference in responsiveness.

At Atom's performance level they should have skipped this and gone straight to a 2Ghz (or more) speed.
Methanoid
and first review I read say they couldnt tell any difference in responsiveness.

At Atom's performance level they should have skipped this and gone straight to a 2Ghz (or more) speed.

Something has to take a long time for people to notice a ~10% difference… how many of us would really notice that something took 4.5 rather than 5 seconds… or 0.9 instead of 1… chop 20-30% and it's more obvious.

It's the same for any processor series, a 10% speed bump is hard to notice outside of benchmarks or very long winded tasks such as a media encode. In those tasks, if anything Atom's slow speed should make the boost more obvious rather than less so as the 10% = more real time.