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Microsoft Windows 7: orgs can pay for 3 more years of support

by Mark Tyson on 10 September 2018, 10:01

Tags: Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), Windows 7

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Microsoft has made a move that will smooth the transition of corporate and institutional customers from Windows 7 to its newest OS. In a blog post entitled 'Helping customers shift to a modern desktop,' the company reminded Windows 7 users that extended support for the OS will be ending on 14th Jan 2020. As that date draws close, Microsoft has announced that it has decided to offer paid Windows 7 Extended Security Updates (ESU) through January 2023.

Windows 7 ESU will be sold on a per-device basis (pricing wasn't revealed). To motivate 'modern OS' hold-outs Microsoft will increase the price for its extended support every year over the three years. It says that Windows 7 ESU will be available to all Windows 7 Professional and Windows 7 Enterprise customers in Volume Licensing, with a discount to customers with Windows software assurance, Windows 10 Enterprise or Windows 10 Education subscriptions.

In a harmonizing initiative, Microsoft has said that Office 365 ProPlus will be supported on devices with active Windows 7 Extended Security Updates (ESU) through January 2023. Of course, this will allow the Windows 7 ESU machines in corporations and institutions to continue to provide Office 365 ProPlus on these machines. Microsoft asks users to reach out to Microsoft partners, or to Microsoft, for further details of the above initiatives.

Lastly, Microsoft used this blog post as an opportunity to trumpet the advantages of Windows 10 with its new capabilities, services, and policies to aid in deployment. It asserts that "the combination of Windows 10 and Office 365 ProPlus delivers the most productive, most secure end user computing experience available." Furthermore, it is committed to working with organisations to resolve any issues affecting the change over from Windows 7 to "a modern desktop". A new intelligent, cloud-based, Desktop Analytics service can help organisations assess the update readiness of Windows and Office clients, for example.



HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

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I'd say there's probably a (very good) reason enterprises and institutions (as well as the ordinary sane person) haven't “updated” to Microsoft's latest “modern OS”. 'nuff sed.
azrael-
I'd say there's probably a (very good) reason enterprises and institutions (as well as the ordinary sane person) haven't “updated” to Microsoft's latest “modern OS”. 'nuff sed.

I think a lot of the time it's just simply the cost and disruption of the whole thing. Plus they often have software which runs fine on one OS but the developer wants more money for the latest version to make it work on a newer OS and won't support the old version on the new OS.
azrael-
I'd say there's probably a (very good) reason enterprises and institutions (as well as the ordinary sane person) haven't “updated” to Microsoft's latest “modern OS”. 'nuff sed.

The very good reason is the effort, time and manpower it takes is phenomenal. Enterprises can control pretty much every aspect of Win10, including it's updating and installed applications through enterprise tools. Win10 enterprise is fine.
Tabbykatze
azrael-
I'd say there's probably a (very good) reason enterprises and institutions (as well as the ordinary sane person) haven't “updated” to Microsoft's latest “modern OS”. 'nuff sed.

The very good reason is the effort, time and manpower it takes is phenomenal. Enterprises can control pretty much every aspect of Win10, including it's updating and installed applications through enterprise tools. Win10 enterprise is fine.

This is very true. I was put on the list to be on the first beta for Win 10 at my organisation over a year ago. As far as I know its still on hold as they don't have the staff to keep on top of the existing install base let alone try something new! And I work for a big enterprise IT organisation…
Just out of interest, given that it's an IT company, would there be a way to install and run it on a VM for testing? So you have Windows 7 (for example) but you can test whether Windows 10 works properly in a VM environment meaning if there are any significant issues the user can just fall back immediately to 7 without any major disruption?

EDIT - apologies if this is a stupid question, just seems like a relatively easy way to minimise disruption but allow widespread testing pre-full deployment.