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Kingston demonstrates 24GB DDR3 memory pushed to the limit

by Tarinder Sandhu on 8 January 2010, 16:05

Tags: Kingston

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Kingston released a 24GB DDR3 kit a couple of days' ago. Coming under the enthusiast-oriented HyperX range, the kit is optimised for the Intel X58 platform.

Comprising of six modules with 4GB of capacity each, the pack costs just shy of £1,000, and we wondered who would make such an investment in system RAM.




We popped along to the Kingston suite at CES 2010 to see it in action, running virtualised copies of Windows 7 that hog more than 20GB of RAM.

The company freely admits that the 24GB kit - a 16GB kit was also released for P55 chipset-based boards - is a fundamentally niche product, but it reckons that gamers who want the ultimate PC may well give it a look.

We'll be taking a look at such a kit in the coming weeks, to see if having a hideous amount of RAM is beneficial to the enthusiast. For most, we imagine, 24GBs of system RAM is dream PC territory.

How would you use 24GB of RAM? Do you see a point to it? We'd love to know.

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HEXUS Forums :: 4 Comments

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Not that long ago 2gb modules were considered over-priced and overkill, now they're the norm. Same will happen with these 4gb ones before long.
Why not add some logic on the board to make a portion of it appear as a sata device (bootable).

I'm surprised no motherboard manufacturer has done this (like iRam, but on the main board, and configurable).
mikerr
Why not add some logic on the board to make a portion of it appear as a sata device (bootable).

I'm surprised no motherboard manufacturer has done this (like iRam, but on the main board, and configurable).

Because as soon as you remove the power from it all the data dissappears - if you make it appear like a disk drive people will put something on it then sue when it vanishes. iRam and so on work by providing battery backup, which adds cost when most people won't want something like that for RAM.

ExpressGate and other onboard flash memory is a better way to go.
I think this is personally great, as kelniel stated 4gb modules will soon be the norm I know plenty of people currently running 12gb which a few years ago would have been just as extreme as this.