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ASRock latest to release Intel Xeon C232 chipset motherboards

by Mark Tyson on 29 December 2015, 13:31

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC), AsRock

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacxc7

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We recently covered the news of ASUS marketing a new gaming motherboard with the requisite Intel C232 chipset so users could choose to equip one of Intel's cost effective Xeon E3-1200 v5 processors. Gigabyte launched a pair of PLUS-WS consumer motherboards featuring the same chipset, but less overt gaming features, shortly after. Now ASRock has joined in the consumer-space C232 chipset trend by offering a choice of either; the gaming orientated ASRock Fatal1ty E3V5 Performance Gaming/OC, or a more sober workstation motherboard called the ASRock E3V5 WS.

It seems like these motherboards are becoming popular with the makers as they reason that when equipped with an Intel E3-1230 v5 Xeon processor end users get much more bank-per-buck. With the latest generation of Xeon CPUs, Intel requires a dedicated chipset, the C232, but this chipset also allows users to equip other Skylake processors. Integrated graphics can't be used with these boards, however.

The ASRock Fatal1ty E3V5 Performance Gaming/OC is said to easily be the basis of "a wonderful gaming rig". It includes ASRock gaming frills such as Gaming Armor, Super Alloy features, ASRock Hyper BCLK Engine, Key Master, Fatal1ty mouse port, F-Stream, and DDR4 Non-Z OC.

The ASRock E3V5 WS is a workstation type motherboard offering good configurability for content creators with support for DDR4 and EEC DIMMs, AMD FirePro and Nvidia Quadro graphics, and 'server grade' LAN thanks to the Intel I219LM chip onboard. Full specifications for the ASRock E3V5 WS can be found here. Highlighted key specifications for this workstation motherboard are reproduced below:

  • Supports the Intel Xeon E3-1200 v5 Processor & 6th Generation Intel Core Processors (Socket 1151)
  • Supports DDR4 2133 & ECC UDIMM memory modules
  • Microsoft Windows 10 64-bit / 8.1 64-bit / 7 32-bit / 7 64-bit / Server 2012 R2 64-bit / Server 2012 64-bit / Server 2008 R2 64-bit support
  • ASRock Super Alloy
  • 2x PCIe 3.0 x16, 3x PCIe 3.0 x1
  • Supports AMD Quad CrossFireX
  • Server-Grade LAN chip support
  • 7.1 CH HD Audio (Realtek ALC892 Audio Codec), ELNA Audio Caps
  • 6x SATA 3
  • 6x USB 3.0 (2 Front, 4 Rear)
  • Supports Full Spike Protection, ASRock Live Update & APP Shop


HEXUS Forums :: 10 Comments

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And again the C236 isn't used. Surely, the extra cost can't be *that* high…

EDIT: Well, I had a look and apparently the C232 sells for $34 while the C236 sells for $49. Still, I think the extra cost is worth it. Here's a comparison between the two chipsets (well, tbh both are the same with the C232 having the extra functionality fused off).
So much better than they used to be and now up there with the others.
azrael-
And again the C236 isn't used. Surely, the extra cost can't be *that* high… …

tbh I can't see anything in the comparison that would justify the extra cost in a gaming enthusiast motherboard. That extra $15 cost of the chipset could easily end up being £20+ at retail, once you've added all the margins up the chain, VAT etc…
scaryjim
tbh I can't see anything in the comparison that would justify the extra cost in a gaming enthusiast motherboard. That extra $15 cost of the chipset could easily end up being £20+ at retail, once you've added all the margins up the chain, VAT etc…
12 PCIe 3.0 lanes more? More USB3 and SATA ports? The ability to use QuickSync? Sounds worth it to me.

Perhaps the problem here is that these motherboards (and others like it) target the wrong audience. Personally, I can't see why a gamer needs a Xeon CPU. Personally, I won't buy any motherboard/CPU combo which doesn't support ECC memory. And on top of that I'd like the board to be reasonably “tricked out”. No need for any overclocking, though, which you can't with a Xeon anyway, so that's fine.
azrael-
12 PCIe 3.0 lanes more? More USB3 and SATA ports? The ability to use QuickSync? Sounds worth it to me.

Perhaps the problem here is that these motherboards (and others like it) target the wrong audience. Personally, I can't see why a gamer needs a Xeon CPU. Personally, I won't buy any motherboard/CPU combo which doesn't support ECC memory. And on top of that I'd like the board to be reasonably “tricked out”. No need for any overclocking, though, which you can't with a Xeon anyway, so that's fine.

hmm why would anyone by a Xeon over an i7? perhaps because games who already have a dedicated GPU wont need the intergrated intel HD gpu, meaning you can get a skylake core cpu for over £100 cheaper at the same clock rates.

As for not being able to overclock the Xeon thats not true. Yes the multiplier is locked but you do still have the ability to overclock the BCLK.